100 Days of Curated Colour – Week 11

Back in April I started the #the100dayproject – an Instagram art project that’s being undertaken by 1000s of people. Of course, when you start one of these longish-term projects (I am curating 100 colour flatlay photos of fabrics and haberdashery, inspired by colour palettes from Design Seeds – #100daysofcuratedcolour), you have no idea what life is going to throw at you in the meantime. The past few weeks have been a slog – I am having one of those times when I am being reminded on all sides of our insecurity, impermanence and fragility, as friends and family struggle with illness, difficult times and downright appalling tragedy. The little gang of us here at home are all fine, but our hearts are aching for our dear friends and family.

One hundred days of curated colour header

So, muddling about with bits of fabric and thread, colours and prints, focusing on these small but beautiful harmonies of colour, enjoying the gorgeous photos on Design Seeds has been a blessed relief. It has been good to have a very structured creative project to focus on and enjoy. I hope you are enjoying them too. I have just a couple of weeks to go on Instagram, but I am a bit behind on here, so maybe 3 more posts (I should be able to do the math, but don’t have energy!

Color curated moodboard by Very Berry for #the100dayproject - 71/100 blue yellow grey

71/100: Design Seeds – Color Collage: Color Confetti

Color curated moodboard by Very Berry for #the100dayproject - 72/100 red purple grey blue lilac

72/100: Design Seeds – Market Hues: Fresh Hues

Color curated moodboard by Very Berry for #the100dayproject - 73/100 pink lilac blue

73/100: Design Seeds: Heavenly Hues: Color Set

Color curated moodboard by Very Berry for #the100dayproject - 74/100 blue red green

74/100: Design Seeds – Wanderlust: Color View

Color curated moodboard by Very Berry for #the100dayproject - 75/100 green brown grey

75/100: Design Seeds – Flora: Flora Tones

Color curated moodboard by Very Berry for #the100dayproject - 76/100 coral pink green blue cream

76/100: Design Seeds – Flora: Flora Tones

the100daysproject day 77Color curated moodboard by Very Berry for #the100dayproject - 77/100 blue green mustard yellow

77/100: Design Seeds – Wanderlust: Mental Vacation

Not sure if I have an overwhelming favourite this week, although I do like (quite surprisingly for me!) 76, which is so fresh and pretty. On Instagram 73 was the clear winner, although 75 had some fans too. I always love to know your favourites, so do let me know.

Peach and raspberry tray-bake cake

Peach and raspberry tray bake fruit cake recipe by Very Berry Handmade

Here’s a quick and delicious fresh fruit cake for you to try. I think of it as rather a traditional recipe – I’ve retrieved it from the notebook of recipes my mum collected together, and I remember it being a family favourite when I was kid. There are no fancy ingredients – it’s the flour, butter, sugar, eggs, milk and fruit type recipe that I still think can’t be beaten.

It’s completely delicious as a sweet treat that you’d have on the tea table with a lovely cuppa, but you can also serve it warm with cream or crème fraîche. The base of the cake is rather like a rich sweet scone (the British version!) than a sponge, so it doesn’t keep terribly well. If you won’t get through it all on the day that you make it, I would pop it in the freezer for a time when you need a treat.

Peach and raspberry tray bake cake recipe

It’s a very practical cake recipe because it starts with store-cupboard ingredients and you can use up whatever soft fruit you have lying around, as long as you have around 250g in total. I had a couple of slightly wrinkly peaches and a handful of raspberries that needed eating up, so went with that fantastic fruit combination, but cherries, blueberries, loganberries, tayberries, gooseberries, blackberries, blackcurrants, nectarines and strawberries are definitely all options.

Peach and Raspberry Traybake Cake

  • Servings: 12 small slices, 9 if you are serving for a dessert
  • Print

Ingredients

  • 150g self raising flour  – I use 50/50 wholemeal and white. If you don’t have SR flour you can add 2 level teaspoons of baking powder to 140g plain flour
  • pinch of salt
  • 60g butter, from the fridge, cut into small pieces
  • 50g granulated sugar
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 2 tablespoons of milk
  • 2 peaches peeled, stoned and chopped into bite-size pieces
  • 100g raspberries, prepared and washed

Directions

  1. Heat oven to 190C (180C fan), Gas 5.
  2. Line a 18cm square (7 inch square) loose-bottomed cake tin with baking parchment. Grease the tin a bit so that the baking parchment won’t move around when you put the mix in the tin later.
  3. Put the flour and salt in a large bowl and add the butter (in small pieces). Rub the butter into the flour with your fingertips – or you can use a food processor or mixer of course.
  4. Stir in the sugar, then take out 2 tbsps of the flour/butter/sugar mixture and set aside to use later.
  5. Stir the beaten egg and milk into the remaining flour and sugar mixture. It should be the consistency of very thick sponge mix or very wet scone mix!
  6. Spread the mixture into the tin, making the centre slightly indented so that it doesn’t rise too much in the middle when baking.
  7. Sprinkle the fruit over the base mixture, followed by the reserved crumble mix.
  8. Bake in the oven for 20-25 minutes, until the top is light golden and the cake is slightly risen. You can test the middle of the cake with a skewer – if it comes out clean of dough, then the cake is cooked.
  9. Cool in the tin for a few minutes then transfer to a wire rack.
  10. Serve warm with softly whipped cream or crème fraîche, or cold with a cuppa..

enjoy logo

 

 

What does sewing mean to you?

Naomi has asked me to share her study into sewing and what it means to people (under 40s only), so I’m reblogging this here for you to read and participate in, if you’d’ like to.

startingstitch

University of Bristol School for Policy StudiesExploring the experiences of people (aged 40 years and younger) who sew as a hobby and the role sewing has played in their lives

My name is Naomi Clarke and I am at the University of Bristol studying for an MSc in Social Work Research.

“What is the research about?”

As part of my MSc I am doing a research project about younger people’s (40 years of age and younger) experiences of sewing as a hobby.

“What is involved?”

I am really interested in exploring people’s stories. This might include what brought you to sewing, when sewing has been particularly meaningful for you, what has kept you sewing, what you enjoy about sewing, and also any potential benefits you feel sewing offers.

I would like people (aged 40 years and under) who sew as a hobby to either make a textile piece or share a photo of a piece already…

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